Everybody has seen them, the ceiling tiles found in basements or commercial spaces, the greyish-white rectangle with small black specks and water stained with yellow-brown circles, maybe a busted corner or two – you know what we are talking about.

With the creation of the dropped ceiling almost 100 years ago, came the necessary creation of the ceiling tile. A novel concept, dropped ceilings were created to hide building infrastructure, including piping, wiring, and ductwork. This created a plenum space and allowed access for maintenance. For a long time, the standard mineral fiber tile was the most cost-effective choice for dropped ceilings. Flash forward years later and many commercial spaces and even residential basements are still using these outdated tiles.

d-finishes-ceilling-water-stainStandard mineral fiber tiles are made up of a combination of glass, wool and slag fibers. They are thick, heavy and are good at absorbing sound. While mineral fiber tiles are affordable, they tend to have mold and mildew issues in areas with higher moisture levels causing them to age more quickly. Replacing moldy or broken ceiling tiles can be an expensive and time-consuming task, especially for a large commercial space with many floors of dropped ceilings. Storing replacement tiles as well as disposing broken or stained tiles can quickly take up space and resources.

Unlike real, standard mineral fiber tiles, MirroFlex Faux Mineral Fiber Ceiling Tiles are thin and lightweight, allowing for easy storage and even easier replacement. Reduce trips to the landfill by simply installing our faux mineral tiles right over existing ceiling tiles. Installing over existing tiles also increases the sound absorption qualities of the tiles. Our faux mineral fiber ceiling tiles are fire retardant, abrasion resistant, and already compatible with 15/16” grid systems, making it easy to replace old, crumbly and stained tiles with smooth, thin faux mineral fiber ceiling tiles.

before-and-after-ceilingInstalling MirroFlex Faux Mineral Fiber Ceiling Tiles prevents dirty, water-stained ceilings.  Our faux mineral fiber ceiling tiles are made of a waterproof thermoplastic that provides flexibility, durability, and an easy-to-clean surface. This smooth, non-absorbent surface made from PVC is washable and wipeable, allowing our tiles to meet most requirements of the FDA, USDA and local health departments for culinary and food manufacturing areas as well as pharmaceutical compounding areas. These tiles have also been tested in accordance with ASTM G 21, the standard practice testing used for determining resistance of synthetic polymeric materials to fungi.

Waterproof thermoformed ceiling panels, such as our faux mineral fiber ceiling tiles, also meet FEMA Class 4 requirements for materials that “can survive wetting and drying and may be successfully cleaned after a flood to render them free of most harmful pollutants. Materials in this class may be exposed to and/or submerged in floodwaters in interior spaces and do not require special waterproofing protection.”

Available in 2’ x 2’ size for lay-in ceiling applications, MirroFlex Faux Mineral Fiber Ceiling Tiles are flat with a tegular/revealed edge, allowing the panel to drop below the grid providing a unique architectural dimension. ATI also offers an easy-to-install, hold-down clip system to help support lay-in ceiling tiles, attaching to the top of any existing grid to hold the tiles (low or high profile) in place. This will prevent the tiles from flipping out of place from air leaks and create a smooth visual. This clip system is only necessary if there are no existing tiles in place to support the new MirroFlex lay-in tiles.

So if you are tired of replacing stained and crumbling standard mineral fiber tiles, consider MirroFlex Faux Mineral Fiber Ceiling Tiles with their smooth, wipeable and washable surface. Forget the mess and install them right on top of your existing tiles, saving your ceiling project time and money. For more solutions available from ATI Decorative laminates, please call 800-849-1320.

 

Sources:

http://www.proceilingtiles.com/mineral-fiber-ceiling-tiles.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mineral_wool